{Mono} Week Eight

Julio Munar Photography

A risk

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Threaded

My girlfriend and future sister-in-law have this amazing business idea, which they’re building right now. It’s called Threaded and they aim to cater to people who love crochet-related accessories. As such, ever the helpful boyfriend that I am, I volunteered my talents to take product shots of the accessories with just a fast 50mm and a speedlight. Those things and a DIY background for the products too.

So, if ever you’re in the hunt for unique accessories, here’s your choice.

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Equipment used: Nikon D90 + Nikkor 50mm f1.8G AF-S + Nikon SB-900 Speedlight

Controlling The Light

When taking photos, controlling light in all its aspects is definitely not a walk in the park. As such, practicing with a single speedlight and a subject is the simplest way to begin.

In my case, I just got my Nikon SB-900 and controlled it wirelessly via my D90’s Creative Lighting System or CLS. The end result are these two photos of Goomba in my room.

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

 

 

Equipment used: Nikon D90 + Nikkor 50mm f1.8 AF-D + Nikon SB-900 Speedlight + Generic Close-up Filter

Just Take A Photo

There’s something I’ve been guilty of lately and it sure isn’t doing me any good.

I’m guilty of planning what gear to buy, of how to gather funds for the said gear and what I’m gonna do with them once they’re in my hands. The bad thing about those things is the neglect my present gear is experiencing from me from all that daydreaming. What I should be doing is just enjoy photography and just take photos.

Hence, to remedy that, I took out Francesca and do what I do best – take photos of still subjects.

Unlike shooting portraits, shooting stills is my first and lasting love. The challenge of shooting something that doesn’t breathe and turning them into something interesting might seem mundane to some, but not to me. You just have to find the right concept and a weekend at home isn’t so mundane anymore.

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Equipment used: Nikon D90 + Nikkor 50mm f1.8D AF + Nikon SB-900 Speedlight

Testing a Generic Close-Up Filter

A few months ago, a friend of mine ordered a generic close-up filter for his Nikon 35mm f1.8G AF-S DX lens. Fast forward to now, I borrowed the filter before it gathered more dust at his place due to neglect. That, and to sharpen my macro ninja skills before they get rusty and dusty as well.

Since there were no bugs for me to spy on, I resorted to my ring and made it act as my model for this test.

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

Julio Munar Photography

The verdict: The results were more than acceptable for me. Sharpness was a-okay but the addition of another layer of glass to your lens can cause some unwanted chromatic abberations in your photos. Focusing is hard too since the filter is fixed and you have to move around to focus on your subject.

Lighting  can be very tricky as well since the added layer of glass only contributes to your woes.  To get around that, I placed the ring on top of a Nikon SB-900 speedlight with a diffuser attached to it. To compensate for the extreme light of the flash, I lowered the ISO, raised the aperture to f22 and maxed out the sync speed at 1/250.

All in all, this filter (which, unfortunately, doesn’t have a brand in its packaging) is best used for small still subjects such as rings or coins. For professional photographers who cover weddings and other fast-paced events, this filter won’t make the cut at all. The same can be said for those who love to shoot bugs and insects in their natural habitat. To solve that, you can get a true macro lens because this filter will just give you a harder time.

Gear:

Nikon D90 + Nikkor 50mm f1.8D AF + Nikon 18-55 f3.5-5.6G AFS VR

Nikon SB900